Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Police Give Downtown Protesters Their Space Demonstrations Sparked by Cases in Nyc, Ferguson Remain Peaceful, Disrupt Traffic

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Police Give Downtown Protesters Their Space Demonstrations Sparked by Cases in Nyc, Ferguson Remain Peaceful, Disrupt Traffic

Article excerpt

Julia Johnson let out a piercing scream on the steps of the City- County Building on Thursday afternoon.

"Stop killing us!" she yelled next. Then, she screamed loudly once more.

Below her, on the steps leading to the Downtown building, dozens of people lay on the ground, their limbs splayed outward as if they were dead. Later, some would be outlined in chalk, and Ms. Johnson would scatter flower petals over their bodies.

On the outskirts of the protest - which at times swelled to include about 100 people - were Pittsburgh police officers on bicycles and on foot, some in plainclothes. Most of them stood silently or chatted with one another while the crowd - over about two hours - chanted slogans such as "no justice, no peace" and "no racist police."

Their message was being echoed at similar demonstrations across the country - they decried a New York City grand jury's decision not to indict an officer who killed Eric Garner in a chokehold this year and lamented a Missouri grand jury's decision not to charge an officer who killed unarmed teenager Michael Brown.

But this demonstration, unlike some in other cities, ended peacefully and without arrests.

Pittsburgh police Cmdr. Eric Holmes stood on the fringes of the protest as groups blocked traffic at four intersections and as one of his officers coordinated with demonstrators to clear the path for a woman driving her child to Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

The issues discussed, he said, were important to many officers on the force. "I obviously recognize that I'm an African-American male, so I'm going to come to the discussion on both sides."

Cmdr. Holmes said he took a "passive approach" to working with the demonstrators. "I allowed them to block the street, and I made that call, so that decision rests with me. We wanted to make sure that individuals are allowed to exercise their First Amendment rights and we do recognize that with that comes a cost, and today that cost was [the] disruption of traffic. …

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