Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Sheriff Defends Lieutenant on 2nd Job Kearney Helps Steelers with Security Matters

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Sheriff Defends Lieutenant on 2nd Job Kearney Helps Steelers with Security Matters

Article excerpt

It's possible to serve law enforcement for 40 hours per week and the Steelers for as many as 30 hours, Allegheny County Sheriff William P. Mullen argued Friday in the wake of an ESPN.com report on one of his lieutenants.

The sheriff also said that moonlighting by law enforcement can have pitfalls but also has public benefit.

If an officer moonlighting for a private firm sees something that might embarrass his secondary employer, will he make the arrest? "Do you turn your head when something happens? There's always the possibility that that occurs," the sheriff said.

The sheriff saw no evidence, though, that Lt. Jack Kearney had shirked his duties when Steelers players got in jams.

The lieutenant leads the evening fugitive squad and coordinates the sheriff's office's involvement in federal task forces. In his spare time he serves as "a babysitter or a traveling secretary" to the Steelers, carrying neither a gun nor handcuffs while teaching players to avoid trouble, said the sheriff.

The ESPN story by Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada focused on the April trial of three men who were found not guilty in the 2013 stabbing of Steelers offensive tackle Mike Adams on the South Side.

Sheriff Mullen said Lt. Kearney met with Mr. Adams only seven hours after the stabbing and "to say that he put ideas in [the player's] head is just not true." He said Lt. Kearney got approval from city police before moving Mr. Adams' vehicle to Steelers property, 12 hours after the incident and after all evidence was collected. Lt. Kearney then played a role in the capture of one of the men charged with stabbing Mr. Adams, which the sheriff said was his normal duty.

The sheriff confirmed ESPN's report that the U.S. Marshal Service complained after Lt. Kearney's role in the 2007 arrest of former Steelers linebacker Richard Seigler, but added that he found no evidence that the lieutenant erred in orchestrating the player's surrender. …

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