Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Mt. Lebanon Deer Cull Begins Monday Police Investigating Illegal Interference

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Mt. Lebanon Deer Cull Begins Monday Police Investigating Illegal Interference

Article excerpt

Two weeks after the state Game Commission approved Mt. Lebanon's controversial deer cull, the divided community is bracing for the first gunshots, expected Monday.

Mt. Lebanon's deputy police chief, Aaron Lauth, said Friday that no additional work shifts or rescheduling of patrols had been planned for the start of Monday's culling operations, but the Game Commission permit requires the contractor to notify police of the times and places where shooting is expected to take place.

"If we get complaints that people are banging pots and pans at night or creating a traffic hazard, obviously we'll respond to any issue when we can," he said of any possible protests.

Mt. Lebanon police were continuing to investigate illegal nighttime visits to one park culling site and a possible attempt to disrupt a corral and baiting station. While most protests have been lawful, there's concern about additional interference.

"We're just hoping to resolve issues and that this goes smoothly," said Brian Benner of Wildlife Services, a nuisance wildlife control company from Tioga County hired by Mt. Lebanon to remove enough white-tailed deer to reduce deer-vehicle collisions by 50 percent in five years.

Following years of debate, commissioners voted last month to pay the company $500 per deer up to $75,000 to remove about 150 white- tailed deer by the end of March. To that end, the Game Commission authorized a cull in which deer will be baited, trapped and shot at night by Wildlife Services employees using .223-caliber rifles with noise suppressors.

Deputy Chief Lauth said an employee of Wildlife Services gave police the Pennsylvania license plate number of a car used by people observed at night near a corral site that was later found to be sprayed with a possible deer repellent. Motion-activated infrared cameras positioned near the site captured photos of the intruders. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.