Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Franklin Park Hopes to Exit Sewer Business Borough Negotiating Takeover with Mccandless Township Sewer Authority

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Franklin Park Hopes to Exit Sewer Business Borough Negotiating Takeover with Mccandless Township Sewer Authority

Article excerpt

Southwestern Pennsylvania has 492 providers of sewer and water service.

Franklin Park hopes to reduce that number by one.

The borough is negotiating with the neighboring McCandless Township Sewer Authority on a plan to transfer ownership of its remaining sewer lines to the authority.

If both parties can agree on terms, the deal could close as soon as June 30. An agreement between Franklin Park and the McCandless authority would serve as a model for similar arrangements, municipal officials said.

Franklin Park sewer rates are significantly higher than McCandless authority rates, but that difference is expected to remain until the bonds used to pay for construction of the lines are paid off, officials said.

Franklin Park Manager Ambrose Rocca met most recently Monday with Dennis Blakley, the authority's superintendent. Following that session, Franklin Park agreed to provide additional financial information on the status of its lines.

Despite its name, the McCandless authority serves a much larger area than the community for which it is named. It's the second- largest sewer authority in the region, behind the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority, executive director William Youngblood said. It serves 52,000 residential, business and institutional customers spread across 44 square miles in seven communities.

Franklin Park's Pine Creek and Fish Run sanitary districts, serving the northern part of the borough, were turned over to the McCandless authority years ago.

The McCandless system includes 400 miles of sewer lines that can be accessed via 10,000 manholes. The authority operates four treatment plants and 17 pumping stations. It owns 53 vehicles, most of them purchased at low cost through a federal surplus program.

The authority's 51 employees can do their own dye tests, flow measurements, telemonitoring and line cleaning. Making use of a global positioning system, or GPS, workers can pinpoint line breaks and identify the location and condition of the nearest manholes. …

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