Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Boston Marathon Bomber Found Guilty Next Phase Will Decide on Death Sentence

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Boston Marathon Bomber Found Guilty Next Phase Will Decide on Death Sentence

Article excerpt

BOSTON - For a city still traumatized by the worst terrorist attack on U.S. soil since 9/11, the 30 guilty verdicts announced Wednesday against Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev offered a moment of closure and unity.

The next phase of the trial, when a seven-woman, five-man federal jury decides how to punish the young Russian immigrant, could prove more painful and divisive given the stark differences in the community between those who want Tsarnaev put to death and those opposed to capital punishment.

But for survivors of that chaotic, bloody day in April 2013 - when twin explosions killed three people and wounded more than 260 others - the government's victory in winning convictions on all counts against Mr. Tsarnaev provided a chance to come together in shared grief and resolve.

At the race finish line on Boylston Street on Wednesday, someone left four yellow roses - one for each victim of the blast and another for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer killed during the search for Mr. Tsarnaev and his older brother, Tamerlan.

"Justice has been served today," said Dic Donohue, a Boston transit officer who was wounded in the shootout between the Tsarnaevs and police. "We have again shown as a society that terrorism will not prevail."

Mr. Tsarnaev, 21, thin, tousle-haired and lightly bearded, stood in the federal courtroom in Boston for a half-hour as the clerk read all 31 pages of the jury's verdict form in a steady, droning voice, reciting the word "guilty" over and over.

But Mr. Tsarnaev showed little interest in the proceedings. He sometimes scratched his neck or cracked his knuckles and always looked away from the jury box.

A few jurors, by contrast, glared at him. And when U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr. asked if their verdicts were unanimous, all of the jurors responded in one loud, clear voice: "Yes. …

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