Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

St. Louis Company Tackles Girls' Short-Shorts; Itty Bitty Clothing Isn't a Proper Fit for Swings and Similar Playthings

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

St. Louis Company Tackles Girls' Short-Shorts; Itty Bitty Clothing Isn't a Proper Fit for Swings and Similar Playthings

Article excerpt

Girls Will Be continues to tackle the seemingly simple, but not- so-simple, task of offering young girls the option to wear clothing that doesn't look cropped, shrunken or conspicuously tight.

The company was founded to cater to the girl who doesn't want to wear pink, sparkles, purple or tiaras. Maybe the girl likes blue!

But look at a typical girls clothing department, and you'd be hard-pressed to find clothing for girls under 12 who don't dream of becoming princesses.

Not that there's anything wrong with that. But being a girl is more than being girly. Imagine that. So the line started with T- shirts: a puppy shirt that wasn't adorned with a rhinestone collar, a rocket ship because (gasp) a girl might like science and robots. I mean, why not?

If you think that sounds like "boy" clothing, therein lies the problem. The daughters of the founders wanted a world of garment choices beyond pink and pastel, ruffles and bows, flowers and hearts. They wanted clothes that felt comfortable and worth playing in.

Now, the company called Girls Will Be, as in let them be whatever they want, is tackling another big shopping challenge for girls (although it's an issue for women as well): Shorts.

Girls Will Be was founded by a trio of siblings, born in St. Louis. Though Sharon Choksi now lives in Austin, her sister, Laura Burns, is a St. Louis-based graphic designer, and their architect brother, David Burns, lives in Chicago.

Side note: Once upon a time, I was one of those girls who didn't prefer pink.

Choksi didn't plan to co-found a clothing line, but she suspected her daughter wasn't the only one who wanted more modest and functional play clothes. She was right. After a newspaper story on her line ran in the Austin American-Statesman last year, the news went viral the story was shared more than 100,000 times from that site.

Everyone knew a girl who wasn't . …

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