Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Alzheimer's Focus of Campbell Documentary Special Screening at Southside Works

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Alzheimer's Focus of Campbell Documentary Special Screening at Southside Works

Article excerpt

When Glen Campbell, the 79-year-old country singer whose hits include "Gentle on My Mind" and "Rhinestone Cowboy," was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease a few years ago, he and his family decided to share it with the public to help raise awareness about the debilitating and deadly disease.

The first stages of Mr. Campbell's disease were documented in the film "I'll Be Me," which followed him on his final "Goodbye Tour" in 2011 and 2012. As part of its efforts to raise awareness of the disease, the Jewish Association on Aging will host an exclusive screening of the documentary film at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at SouthSide Works Cinema.

"It's an epidemic, in particular in the elderly community," said Deborah Winn-Horvitz, the CEO and president of the JAA. "If you couple that with the demographics of Western Pennsylvania, it's particularly concerning for the Pittsburgh population to be aware of this disease."

Of the top 10 causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's is the only one that cannot be prevented, cured or slowed, according to the Alzheimer's Association. It affects 5.3 million Americans.

Screening of the documentary will begin at 6:30 p.m., followed by a performance and Q&A session with Glen Campbell's daughter, Ashley.

"My goal is to have as many people see the film as possible, and increase awareness for the entire population," Ms. Campbell said, "This disease is an epidemic and we need to create an outcry for research on beating this disease."

The film received one Oscar nomination, for the song Mr. Campbell wrote and recorded after his diagnosis, "I'm Not Gonna Miss You."

Ms. Campbell, a singer-songwriter, said the movie is overall very uplifting because it features someone who is pushing through against all odds.

"As a provider, we want to get the word out that just because someone has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's or dementia, their life is not over. They can still very much have a high quality of life and that's the other thing this film shows," Ms. Winn-Horvitz said.

The JAA's screening is the only showing of "I'll Be Me" that has been licensed in Western Pennsylvania through Thursday. …

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