Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

High-Speed Weekend of Boating at Lake of the Ozarks Begins in Idle under No-Wake Policy

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

High-Speed Weekend of Boating at Lake of the Ozarks Begins in Idle under No-Wake Policy

Article excerpt

LAKE OF THE OZARKS * Boaters up and down the Lake of the Ozarks grumbled Friday as a weekend that was supposed to be about high- speed water recreation idled under a no-wake policy.

Gov. Jay Nixon ordered the policy Thursday out of fear that boating activity on high floodwater would damages docks, boats and the shoreline.

Despite some complaints, boaters for the most part acknowledged that the governor had probably made the right decision.

So instead of speeding up and down the main channel, Friday's main attraction was standing on top of Bagnell Dam where hundreds of people arrived by the carload to watch the water crashing down below through the open locks.

Throughout the dam area, lake goers were willing to give Nixon a break.

"I'm not going to be a brat and cry about it," Darcy Kitchen of Eldon, Mo., said about not being on the water.

"You don't always get what you want when you want," she added. "It's the right thing to do."

Others settled for some good-natured frustration.

"It's killing us," Todd Corrigan said with a smile.

Corrigan, of St. Louis, was at the dam with a pair of 10-year- olds, his son Reed and Reed's friend Jenna.

"Normally we'd be on the water right now," he said. "We want to go play."

Nixon's order was in response to water levels four feet higher than normal.

The order covers the entire lake and means that boats are required to operate at only idle speed.

Despite his disappointment, Corrigan said he understood the policy.

"I think the people who have places here understand it best; it's the outsiders that probably have the biggest problem with it," he said.

Kory Townes, one of those outsiders, said the no-wake policy was unnecessary.

Townes, from O'Fallon, Mo., said potential damage to docks was being overblown.

"It's just some rich people trying to protect what's theirs," he said.

Danielle Maul, of St. …

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