Newspaper article Roll Call

King V. Burwell Ruling Doesn't End Our Fight for Real Health Care Reform | Commentary

Newspaper article Roll Call

King V. Burwell Ruling Doesn't End Our Fight for Real Health Care Reform | Commentary

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King v. Burwell Ruling Doesn't End Our Fight for Real Health Care Reform | Commentary

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* By Reps. Phil Roe and John Fleming

* July 8, 2015, 12:57 p.m.

On June 25, the Supreme Court ruled the IRS has the authority under the president's health care law to financially support individuals purchasing health insurance through federally operated exchanges. The text of the Affordable Care Act, however, clearly states that subsidies were singularly intended for people who received insurance through a state owned and operated exchange. The court's ruling is a familiar SCOTUS maneuver to yet again salvage Obamacare by rewriting the law.

As physicians who have collectively spent more than 70 years caring for patients, we know firsthand that the Affordable Care Act has changed health care in America - and not for the better. President Barack Obama's oft-stated goals were to lower costs and expand access to care, but mounting evidence shows the law falls markedly short in both regards.

While the Supreme Court's King v. Burwell ruling is a political victory for the president, it is an unparalleled defeat for the rule of law, and another devastating blow for struggling families. Obamacare is still broken beyond repair - despite the high court's reprieve. As premiums continue to rise and out-of-pocket costs limit families' access to care, the only thing bipartisan about this law is its growing opposition.

In June, the Obama administration released health insurance premium rate requests for 2016. Neither of us were surprised to see many insurers have proposed double digit rate hikes, with a 36 percent increase in premiums expected in Tennessee and a median increase of 18 percent expected in Louisiana, with some plans increasing by as much as 55 percent. Most insurers pointed fingers at the rising cost of health care, prescription drugs and technology as culprits for these escalating costs. …

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