Newspaper article International New York Times

Agency Chief Quits after Huge Breach in Security ; Two Attacks Garnered Personal Data on over 25 Million Americans

Newspaper article International New York Times

Agency Chief Quits after Huge Breach in Security ; Two Attacks Garnered Personal Data on over 25 Million Americans

Article excerpt

Ms. Archuleta stepped down one day after it was revealed that sweeping cyberintrusions at the agency had resulted in the theft of over 25 million people's personal information.

The director of the Federal Office of Personnel Management resigned on Friday, the White House said, one day after it was disclosed that sweeping intrusions into the agency's computers had resulted in the theft of the personal information of more than 25 million people.

The director, Katherine Archuleta, went to the White House to inform President Obama of her decision, and the president accepted her resignation. The White House spokesman, Josh Earnest, said she had decided to resign "of her own volition."

Beth Cobert, the deputy director for management of the Office of Management and Budget, will step in while a permanent replacement is found.

Ms. Archuleta, who assumed her post in November 2013, had been under pressure to resign since last month, when she announced the first of two separate but related computer intrusions that compromised the personal information of 4.2 million current and former federal workers, including Social Security numbers, addresses, health and financial histories and other private details.

On Thursday, she said the breach had also led to the theft of personal data of 21.5 million people who had applied for government background checks, most likely affecting anyone subjected to such an investigation since 2000.

On a conference call on Thursday detailing the scope of the intrusion, she had said she would not step down despite calls from members of Congress in both parties that she do so.

The chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Representative Jason Chaffetz, Republican of Utah, who had called for her resignation, said her decision on Friday was "the absolute right call."

In announcing the results of a forensic investigation of the episode, whose existence was known but not its sweeping toll, the agency said on Thursday that hackers had stolen "sensitive information" from 19.7 million people who had been subjected to a government background check, as well as 1. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.