Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

Business Watch: Wedding and Special Occasion Resale Business Opens

Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

Business Watch: Wedding and Special Occasion Resale Business Opens

Article excerpt

A resale business focused on weddings and special occasions is up and running, though a storefront will have to wait, owner Kim Turner said.

Turner opened Your Special Day in the second floor of the Governor's Row House, a special-event venue she owns with her husband, Chris Turner. The initial plan was to open a store, but for now she is selling by appointment at the Row House.

"We decided, for now, it would be easier since I'm running both businesses," she said.

Turner said she can set up appointments in the evenings or on weekends, as long as the Row House isn't booked for an event. She gradually is photographing items and putting them on YourSpecialDayTopeka.com and the Your Special Day Topeka page on Facebook so potential customers can see whether she has what they want.

The business sells dresses, shoes, garters, ring pillows and decorations, Turner said. Some items, like dishes and decorations with widespread appeal, are available to rent, she said.

"Primarily I'm doing things on consignment," she said.

Some of the items haven't been taken out of their packaging, Turner said, and others have been only gently used.

"Even one of the dresses I have still has tags on it," she said.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, call (785) 806-0125 or email YourSpecialDay45@gmail.com.

Senior relocation

business opens

Caring Transitions, a business that attempts to smooth transitions when someone moves to a health care facility or after a death, has opened a franchise serving northeast Kansas.

Ken France and Suzette Mack, who are spouses and co-owners of Caring Transitions in the Heartland, said they are working with families and long-term care facilities in Shawnee, Douglas, Leavenworth and Wyandotte counties. They contract for the actual moving of furniture and boxes, but their primary work is assisting families with planning what possessions to keep or get rid off when a person needs to downsize or dies, France said. It was a speciality they got interested in after Mack's parents died and they had to go through the process of sorting and selling their belongings, he said.

Mack said transitions are emotional, both for the person moving to a facility and his or her family. A person may not be able to take all of his or her possessions that had meaning, but they can ease the process by listening to the person's stories, taking photographs of items that won't fit into a new living space and suggesting the person donate treasured possessions to his or her church or a favorite charity, she said.

"The first thing we'll do is go to their home and sit and listen to them," she said.

France said they also use a software program that shows how items of different dimensions might fit in the person's new room. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.