Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Business Digest

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Business Digest

Article excerpt

SLUCare gets new CEO * St. Louis University officials confirmed Monday that they're developing a succession plan for medical school dean Dr. Philip Alderson and have appointed a new CEO to lead the university's physician group, SLUCare. In a letter sent to students and faculty on Monday, university president Fred P. Pestello announced Dr. Robert M. Heaney as SLUCare CEO, effective immediately. The appointment establishes one leader for SLUCare; after SLUCare CEO Gary Van House left in September 2013, management of the physician group was handled by a five-member office of the CEO. Kathy Merlo will continue as the group's chief operating officer and will be responsible for managing day-to-day operations. Heaney, who most recently served as senior associate dean for clinical affairs, will report to Alderson and serve as CEO through December 2016, at which time the university plans to have "additional conversations" with the new dean about SLUCare's structure. Alderson, named medical school dean in February 2008, will continue in his role until a successor is named. Starting this fall, Pestello will form a committee to begin a nationwide search for Alderson's successor. Once the new dean is in place, Alderson will take a sabbatical before returning to the "phased retirement program" to assist with fundraising and other duties.

Ukrainian firm settles * A Ukrainian firm and its CEO are paying $30 million to settle U.S. regulators' charges they were part of an international web of hackers and traders that made $100 million by getting advance peeks at sensitive corporate news releases. The Securities and Exchange Commission announced the settlement Monday with Jaspen Capital Partners and CEO Andriy Supranonok, who agreed to make restitution for their allegedly ill-gotten gains. They neither acknowledged nor denied wrongdoing but did agree to refrain from future violations of the securities laws. The SEC last month brought civil charges against Jaspen, Supranonok and 32 other people and companies in the U.S. and Europe, accusing them of raking in $100 million over five years by stealing looks at corporate press releases before they were made public and then trading on that information ahead of the pack. …

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