Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

I've Realised I Need to Calm Down and Take a Step Back ; as the New Series of Extreme Railway Journeys Gets Underway, Host Chris Tarrant Talks to GEMMA DUNN about New the Territories Explored and His Health Scare Last Year

Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

I've Realised I Need to Calm Down and Take a Step Back ; as the New Series of Extreme Railway Journeys Gets Underway, Host Chris Tarrant Talks to GEMMA DUNN about New the Territories Explored and His Health Scare Last Year

Article excerpt

Do the railway journeys you embark on become more extreme throughout the series? YES, they probably do. The scariest moment came when we were up in a helicopter over the Canadian Rockies. I'm not very good with helicopters and there I am with a handful of dynamite sticks to light and throw out of the window! They basically blow up certain spots of snow to prevent avalanches from wiping out trains and killing people.

When we took off it was a clear morning, but out of nowhere a huge snow storm erupted and we're flying over jagged mountain peaks with no radar. The engine then starts making a siren noise, which means we're going down too fast!

After what felt like an hour (but was actually about two minutes), the snow cleared and we landed to a crowd giving us high fives. I don't know why we did it - it was almost like a silly boy's adventure.

Your journeys don't look the comfiest. Do any particularly bumpy rides stick out? DID you see the bouncy bit from Thailand to Myanmar? It was unbelievable; there were passengers behind me being thrown into the air. People were asking if I would like a cup of coffee, but it would have ended up all over my head.

The railway used quite nice locomotives, but the tracks are knackered and not fit for purpose. It's a serious problem all around the world - a lot of money is spent on new trains but no money is spent on the tracks, which has disastrous consequences.

Did you face any extreme climates on your travels? THE Siberian Arctic was - as expected - beautiful, but freezing. We'd admire the view from the train window for days at a time and when we eventually got outside it was minus 20 degrees. The Russians are so tough, they don't need heating!

We visited Bovanenkovo gas field, two miles north of Moscow, and interviewed a couple of miners who said it gets to minus 50 in the winter, but they don't mind as they have a "good job to support their families". That one field produces enough gas to heat the whole of Western Europe for the next 75 years!

The Atacama Desert in Bolivia was stunning too, but filming was tough as we all suffered bad altitude sickness; at 14,000 feet the cameraman was on oxygen, the tour guide was sick, and I had awful headaches. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.