Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

MAGNIFICENT SEVENTH ; KC Turns Toronto Defensive Lapse into Five Runs, Takes 2-0 Edge in Series

Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

MAGNIFICENT SEVENTH ; KC Turns Toronto Defensive Lapse into Five Runs, Takes 2-0 Edge in Series

Article excerpt

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- The pop-up into right field was playable.

Communication, however, between two Toronto defenders appeared garbled Saturday inside Kauffman Stadium.

Ben Zobrist's short fly ball landed between second baseman Ryan Goins, who looked to be gaining position to make the catch, and Jose Bautista, who stopped as if the ball was laced with performance- reducing drugs.

Their leather was not scuffed a bit on that key misplay to begin the seventh inning.

The baseball dropped into the grass in shallow right, jump- starting Kansas City and short-circuiting Blue Jays pitcher David Price as the Royals rallied for a 6-3 victory in Game 2 of the American League Championship Series.

"If you get the first guy on with no outs," said Royals outfielder Lorenzo Cain, "there's always a chance for a big rally."

Even against a pitcher as good as Price. The left-handed stalwart was untouchable through six innings, yet he remained winless in all seven postseason games he has started -- four for Tampa Bay, one for Detroit and now two for Toronto.

This time, Price retired 18 in a row after allowing a first- pitch single to the most interesting leadoff man in the world, Alcides Escobar.

Yet the Royals never flinched, despite the one-hit shutout Price was throwing.

"They were looking for that one crack because David was so good," Blue Jays manager John Gibbons said. "David was so good and it was a shame it had to end that way."

Not altogether surprising, though, after watching the Royals roar back in Game 4 of the ALDS at Houston. In addition, the rally Saturday was the fourth from a multi-run deficit for KC this postseason.

At any time, the Royals seem capable of moving the line on offense as if brushing sauce on burnt ends.

Not even Price, who tied a Toronto postseason record with eight strikeouts, is immune from the highly contagious production that defines a Kansas City rally ... and almost defies imagination.

"You knew Price was getting his pitch count up, at least a little bit," said first baseman Eric Hosmer, "and that was the time to do something, especially with the meat of our order coming up. …

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