Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

God's Goodness Negates Corruption

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

God's Goodness Negates Corruption

Article excerpt

Corruption is a worldwide problem, and it's not just in government that we find it. Health, relationships, morals, public safety, financial stability - every day the news seems to bring us stories of corruption in a multitude of human arenas.

I have faced corruption in several forms throughout my own life. At one point, I worked in a city and a profession where it was widely accepted that to be successful, one had to mislead the public. I assumed it was necessary to participate in this deception in order to make a living. But the corruption took its toll. I eventually witnessed the deterioration of my career and my marriage fell apart.

I was tempted to blame a lot of people, including myself, for what had transpired. What brought me up short was something the Apostle Paul wrote: "There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it." And he added an important piece of advice: "Wherefore, my dearly beloved, flee from idolatry" (I Corinthians 10:13, 14).

My solace from the personal and professional despair I found myself in had a lot to do with the fact that I was beginning to understand something I needed to see: the role that idolatry had been playing in my life. The teachings of the Bible and of Christian Science made it clear to me that depending on a government, employer, or client - and letting that dependence govern my actions - was to worship an idol. Paul urged us to flee from idolatry and instead rely on God - the one incorruptible good - to meet our daily needs.

As Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of The Christian Science Monitor, noted, "St. Paul beautifully enunciates this fundamental fact of Deity as the 'Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all.' This scientific statement of the origin, nature, and government of all things coincides with the First Commandment of the Decalogue, and leaves no opportunity for idolatry or aught besides God, good" (Message to The Mother Church for 1900," p. …

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