Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

NPR Is Graying, and Public Radio Is Worried about It

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

NPR Is Graying, and Public Radio Is Worried about It

Article excerpt

WASHINGTON * As NPR came of age in the 1980s, its audience matured with it. Three decades later, that is starting to look like a problem.

Many of the listeners who grew up with NPR are now reaching retirement age, leaving NPR with a challenge: How can it attract younger and middle-age audiences whose numbers are shrinking to replace them?

NPR's research shows a growing gulf in who is listening to the likes of "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered," the daily news programs that have propelled public radio for more than 30 years. Morning listening has dropped 11 percent overall since 2010, according to Nielsen research that NPR has made public; afternoon listening is down 6 percent over the same period.

Perhaps more troubling are the broader demographic trends. NPR's signal has gradually been fading among the young. Listening among "Morning Edition's" audience, for example, has declined 20 percent among people younger than 55 in the past five years. Listening for "All Things Considered" has dropped about 25 percent among those in the 45-to-54 segment.

The growth market? People over 65, who were increasing in both the morning and afternoon hours.

The graying of NPR, and the declines overall, are potentially perilous to the public radio ecosystem. NPR, based in Washington, serves programs to nearly 900 "member" stations, which rely in large part on financial contributions from their listeners. The stations, in turn, kick back some of their pledge-drive dollars to NPR to license such programs as "Car Talk," "Fresh Air" and "Morning Edition" (federal tax dollars supply only a small part of stations' annual budgets, and virtually none of NPR's).

But as audiences drift to newer on-demand audio sources such as podcasts and streaming, the bonds with local stations and the contributions that come with them may be fraying.

"It's a problem, and no one has really figured out what to do about it," said Jeff Hansen, the program director at Seattle public radio station KUOW. He noted that public radio was invented by people in their 20s in the 1970s, largely at stations funded by colleges and universities. "What they didn't realize at the time was that what they were inventing was programming for people like themselves baby boomers with college degrees."

That audience has largely stayed loyal. The median age of public radio listeners has roughly tracked the median age of baby boomers. The median NPR listener was 45 years old in 1995; now he or she is 54, according to Tom Thomas, co-chief executive of the Station Resource Group, a public-radio strategy and research consortium. "The (aging) trend has been gentle and continuous for the last 20 years," he said.

To shore up its appeal to a younger crowd, NPR's contemporary managers say that they are going where younger ears are, both via digital technology and with programming that has younger people in mind. …

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