Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

2,100 Donate Their Bodies to University for Medical Research ; Corpses Are Used to Help Train New Doctors and Nurses

Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

2,100 Donate Their Bodies to University for Medical Research ; Corpses Are Used to Help Train New Doctors and Nurses

Article excerpt

MORE than 2,000 people in the last five years have agreed to donate their body for medical research at University of Manchester.

Their bequests will help train the next generation of doctors, dentists and nurses.

Manchester is one of 29 British medical schools that use donated bodies to teach their students, according to the Human Tissue Authority.

People who sign the form give their consent for their body to be used for research after their death, including dissection in anatomy classes.

Professors and staff in the bequeathals department say such donations are vital for medical, dental, nursing and life science students in Manchester.

Ingrid Gouldsborough, a Professor of Anatomy at the University of Manchester, said: "It is an incredible gesture for a person to make and at the university we really appreciate it.

"It is incredibly valuable to us and our students really appreciate it too. We do a nursing session once a year and they all say how wonderful it is. You can read everything from a text book, but dissections and prosections are a much better way to learn.

"It gives students much better spacial awareness of the human body.

"It's fundamental to their understanding of the anatomy."

For the majority of medical students, their first anatomy class is their first encounter with death, which is why it is so vital to their training.

The university requires around 50 bodies for medical science a year and they receive hundreds of bequeathals.

When bodies are not required in the anatomy department, some are used for surgical training.

The M.E.N. was told 2,121 people had filled in the forms since 2010.

Bequeathals are turned away if the coroner is involved and a postmortem needs to be carried out.

For example, if there are any documented transmissible diseases, such as MRSA, certain types of dementia and obesity, they may not be suitable to donate. …

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