Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Underestimating IS; Europe's Labor Shortage; Korea and Terrorism; Argentinian Politics; Democracy in Jamaica

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Underestimating IS; Europe's Labor Shortage; Korea and Terrorism; Argentinian Politics; Democracy in Jamaica

Article excerpt

The Reporter / EthiopiaUnderestimating the enemy "The Islamic State expects from us a combination of cowardice and overreaction. Its ultimate ambition is to provoke a clash of civilizations between the West and the Muslim world. We must not fall prey to that strategy...," writes Dominique Moisi, senior adviser at the French Institute for International Relations. "We are at war. It would be wrong - even dangerous - not to admit it. And to win will require clarity, unity, and firmness.... We barely know our enemy, except for the intensity of his hatred and the depth of his cruelty. To understand his strategy, we must recognize him for what he is: an intelligent - and, in his own way, rational - adversary. For too long, we have despised and underestimated him."

Today's Zaman / Istanbul, Turkey Europe's labor shortage and the migrants"[C]alls for the reintroduction of border controls and a new 'Fortress Europe' risk giving Europe's demagogues the lead and making it harder than ever to convince people of the need to integrate more newcomers into the European Union's workforce," writes Giles Merritt. "The climate of fear that the [Paris] attacks have created threatens to obscure a key statistic: unless EU countries open their doors wider to immigration, the current ratio of four working-age people for every pensioner will fall to 2:1 by mid-century, if not earlier.... [T]he truth is that the European economy badly needs the young people pouring across its frontiers...."

The Chosun Ilbo / Seoul, South Korea Korea is too 'nonchalant' about global terrorism Korea is "nonchalant ... about the threat of global terrorism," states an editorial. "A comprehensive anti- terrorism bill has been in limbo in the National Assembly for a staggering 14 years, while [Korean] tourists are jetting off to Europe in droves apparently oblivious to the dangers.... The bill is in limbo because opposition lawmakers feared it would give the [National Intelligence Service] too much power to spy on individual citizens. But it was in fact the brainchild of the left-leaning administrations of Kim Dae-jung and Roh Moo-hyun, who had closer experience than most of the authoritarian governments of the past, so it is a mystery why opposition lawmakers are so afraid of it. …

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