Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Why the Paris Climate Talks Were Different; Agriculture and Climate Change; Feminism Goes Mainstream; Russia as a Distraction; Talking with IS

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Why the Paris Climate Talks Were Different; Agriculture and Climate Change; Feminism Goes Mainstream; Russia as a Distraction; Talking with IS

Article excerpt

Les Echos / ParisWhy this summit on climate is different"Given its past diplomatic failings, whether in relation to Russia or the handling of the Syrian conflict, there are reasons to worry about France's capacity to produce a result that would measure up to expectations," writes Jean-Francis Pecresse about the Paris climate talks. "This time, however, there is room for hope. First because Paris, learning lessons from the Copenhagen failure in 2009, has had the good idea of gathering the heads of state and of government at the very start of the conference, in order to provide the political momentum necessary to put the pressure on their respective delegations. Secondly because France is not alone. It has natural allies: Germany, but also the United States and China, the world's two main polluters, are on our side - as long as their obligations are reasonable."

The Globe and Mail / TorontoDon't forget agriculture in climate talks"As world leaders meet to discuss climate change in Paris, the headlines are being dominated by carbon taxes, clean energy, the future of the oil sands and coal. One economic sector, agriculture, is overshadowed by these more obvious polluters - which is odd, given that food and farming systems are both major emitters of greenhouse gases and particularly vulnerable to climatic shifts...," write Evan Fraser and Sylvain Charlebois. "Throughout history, agricultural problems have acted as catalysts that trigger widespread social and humanitarian crises.... Innovations in food science can create novel products for consumers that are nutritious and less taxing on the environment to produce.... Simultaneously, we must be much more ambitious in our development targets and establish grassroots partnerships in poorer parts of the world where food security and farm livelihoods are particularly vulnerable to climate change."

New Zealand Herald / Auckland, New ZealandFeminism goes mainstream in politics"It's becoming increasing[ly] popular to identify as feminist, even if you're a man, and especially if you're a politician. This year has seen a surge of concern about gender inequality, discrimination and the degraded position of women in many aspects of New Zealand life. …

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