Newspaper article International New York Times

Charlie Hebdo Is True to Form a Year Later ; the French Newspaper, Known for Biting Satire, Marks Attacks Accordingly

Newspaper article International New York Times

Charlie Hebdo Is True to Form a Year Later ; the French Newspaper, Known for Biting Satire, Marks Attacks Accordingly

Article excerpt

A special issue of the newspaper is on sale in France during a week of events paying tribute to the 17 people who were killed one year ago.

A special issue of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo has gone on sale in France, amid a week of official commemorations and other events paying tribute to the 17 people who were killed one year ago in attacks at the newspaper's office and other locations in the Paris area.

The commemorations have been accompanied by a flurry of book releases and new documentaries, as well as by a resurgence of questions about whether French intelligence and police services failed to adequately assess security threats against the newspaper, which had been under police protection.

The newspaper has printed about a million copies of the issue, released on Wednesday, up from a typical print run of about 100,000, and it includes drawings by illustrators who were killed in the attacks as well as guest contributions.

"Charlie is insolence elevated as a virtue, and bad taste as a mainstay of elegance," the culture minister, Fleur Pellerin, wrote in her contribution to the issue. "For all of us, continue to create, to draw freedom."

Laurent Sourisseau, the newspaper's editorial director, wrote, "It isn't two little idiots in balaclavas who are going to screw up our life's work."

"They aren't going to see Charlie die, it is Charlie that is going to see them die," he added.

The commemorations are being held less than two months after the coordinated attacks on Nov. 13 that left 130 dead in the Paris area, most of them in neighborhoods not far from Charlie Hebdo's former offices.

On Wednesday morning, Parisians did not appear to be flocking to newsstands to buy the special issue, as they had for the first issue to be published after the attacks, when millions of copies of the newspaper quickly sold out.

Mimoun Nekrouz, 42, a newspaper seller near the St.-Paul neighborhood of Paris, said he had 200 copies but had sold only 20 so far. "It's completely different from last year, when I had a line in front of the kiosk and everything was gone in an hour."

Those who were buying copies on Wednesday said they wanted to support the newspaper. …

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