Newspaper article Charleston Gazette Mail

Retired Putnam Teacher Pens Book on Investing ; Developed the "Quartile Method' of Making Money in the Stock Market

Newspaper article Charleston Gazette Mail

Retired Putnam Teacher Pens Book on Investing ; Developed the "Quartile Method' of Making Money in the Stock Market

Article excerpt

bcalwell@cnpapers.com 304-348-5188

It's a small book, but it contains a strategy for investing in the stock market that its author, Bill Hollis, says has been successful for him. Hollis, who resides in the Evergreen Ridge area of Putnam County, near the Mason County line, is a retired math and science teacher. He has written a guidebook titled "Making Money in Stocks Using the Quartile Method. New York-based Page Publishing is the publisher.

According to Hollis, his quartile method is easy to understand and uses simple math than can be done on a basic calculator.

Hollis' book explains the quartile method in easy-to-understand terms. It also has a glossary of terms related to investing in the stock market.

"It's a very small book, but it is jam packed with facts and methods that I use in selecting the stocks, said Hollis, during a recent visit to the Hansford Center in St. Albans.

The quartile method, he said, is the "first time that anybody has ever come up with a procedure to suggest what is a reasonable price to purchase a stock and when, eventually, you should sell the stock, he said.

Hollis gets most of his information about potential companies to invest in by visiting financial websites on the Internet.

Using the quartile method, investors need to know the 52-week high and the 52-week low for any stock.

"The price of the stock is going to go up and down during the year; when it goes down, below the bottom fourth, that's when you buy. And when it goes above the top fourth is when you sell. While you're waiting for it to get up there, you get dividends. So you get both, dividends and capital gains from the procedure, he said.

Before developing the quartile method, Hollis was a typical investor. His old, pre-quartile portfolio gained 17.84 percent return on investment. Thus far, his new quartile portfolio has gained 36. …

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