Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

Key Things You Must and Must Not Do in an Interview ; New Research Has Revealed It Takes Just 12 Words for a Potential Recruiter to Make a Decision on Whether to Hire You or Not. So What Are the Most Important Things to Do and Avoid in an Interview?

Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

Key Things You Must and Must Not Do in an Interview ; New Research Has Revealed It Takes Just 12 Words for a Potential Recruiter to Make a Decision on Whether to Hire You or Not. So What Are the Most Important Things to Do and Avoid in an Interview?

Article excerpt

NERVES are to be expected at job interviews - they're relatively short meetings that can have a big impact on your life.

ere's lots of things you'll want to prepare in advance, like making sure your CV is as sharp as possible, that you've got a portfolio brimming with the best examples of your work if applicable and you've practised many of the questions you can reasonably expect to be asked.

But all of that might well turn out to be pretty much irrelevant. According to new research, it's actually the rst 12 words that you say that have the biggest bearing on your chances of success in an interview situation.

e study, conducted by employment assistance charity e Resurgo Trust, suggests that it is the seemingly innocuous chit chat at the very outset that forms the biggest proportion of an interviewers rst impression and largely determines how well they will view you as a candidate.

So whether it's the initial 'hello' to the receptionist, or the greeting you mumble when introduced to your potential future boss - be careful, these rst few words are likely to prove crucial in securing your dream job.

Of course, if you do manage to get through that initial conversation unscathed, there are still a few notable pitfalls you need to negotiate your way through.

SHAKE IT UP It's become something of a cliche, but there are still plenty of hiring professionals who read a considerable amount into your handshake.

e importance of judging the greeting correctly cannot be understated. A peck on the cheek might be appropriate in some situations, but rarely - if ever - in an interview.

Keep it simple and opt for the traditional handshake at the beginning and end of the meeting. …

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