Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

On This Valentine's Day, Science Proves to Imitate Love - and Vice Versa

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

On This Valentine's Day, Science Proves to Imitate Love - and Vice Versa

Article excerpt

Dubbed by Albert Einstein as "spooky action at a distance," the phenomenon of quantum entanglement occurs when two particles are so deeply linked that even if they are billions of light-years apart, actions impelled on one particle have an effect on the other. It's a phenomenon similar to the love bond which can develop between human beings - a different kind of powerful force which has sometimes been called spooky too.

In quantum entanglement, if one particle were spun in a clockwise direction, for instance, the other would spin counterclockwise.

"Things get really interesting when two electrons become entangled," Ronald Hanson from the University of Delft in the Netherlands said in a statement about the phenomenon.

"They are perfectly correlated, when you observe one, the other one will always be opposite. That effect is instantaneous, even if the other electron is in a rocket at the other end of the galaxy."

Initially posited by Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen in 1935, quantum entanglement was believed to be impossible - or at least paradoxical - given what they knew about physical reality.

But subsequent studies proved how it could happen anyway. Physicist John Stewart Bell made considerable leeway in his 1964 paper that conceived what we now know as Bell's Theorem. He demonstrated the phenomenon by separating particles so far apart that effects on both could not possibly be caused by local variables, refuting the principle of local realism in quantum mechanics.

But despite his tests, Dr. Bell's theorem wasn't proved substantially because of its loopholes - that is, until recently.

Dr. Hanson was among several groups of researchers that found support for Bell's Theorem in spite of the loopholes. Their performance was published in Nature magazine.

Hanson and his team used a two diamonds, each with a trapped electron in its atomic matrix. …

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