Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Perfect Storm for the EU; Is Greece to Blame?; Addressing Global Poverty; Stabilizing Global Markets

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Perfect Storm for the EU; Is Greece to Blame?; Addressing Global Poverty; Stabilizing Global Markets

Article excerpt

The Straits Times / SingaporePerfect storm for the European Union"European leaders hoped that difficult winter weather conditions would give them some respite from the masses of refugees now besetting their continent.... But neither low winter temperatures nor the measures taken by some European Union governments aimed at discouraging new arrivals appeared to have made the slightest bit of difference...," writes Jonathan Eyal. "The EU has survived many crises. Yet at no time since World War II has it faced such a 'perfect storm' of financial, political and humanitarian challenges, all rolled into one. And at no time in the past did the continent seem so determined to sleepwalk ... into a disaster."

Financial Times / LondonFault lines in the European Union"The [European Union] is at risk of four fractures...," writes Wolfgang Munchau. "The first is a north-south break-up over refugees.... A second north-south faultline is the euro. Nothing has changed here. Echoes of the eurozone crisis linger and the Greek position remains unsustainable. The third is an east-west divide. Will the open societies of western Europe want to be tied into an ever-closer union with ... central or eastern Europe? Finally, there is Brexit.... A British vote to leave the EU may trigger referendums in Sweden or Denmark, adding further uncertainty.... After nearly 60 years of European integration, we are entering the age of disintegration. It will not necessarily lead to a formal break-up of the EU - this is extremely unlikely - but it will make the EU less effective."

Kathimerini / AthensIs Greece really to blame? "We tend to lament the decline of the Greek political system, the destruction of the social fabric, and the eventual economic meltdown. There are many reasons for our condition, most important however is the decades- long failure of the Greek establishment to adapt to European standards. If the problems were exclusive to Greece, then one perhaps could blame them on our reactionary Greek character or our inept and irresponsible political elites...," writes Costas Iordanidis. "More worrying at the moment, however, is the apparent breakdown in the European system at large. …

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