Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

Music Is Effective Therapy in Improving Medical Outcomes

Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

Music Is Effective Therapy in Improving Medical Outcomes

Article excerpt

Dear Doctor K: I recently visited a friend in the hospital. During my visit, a music therapist came in and played music for her. The idea of music therapy seems very New Age to me. Is there any evidence for it?

Dear Reader: Music therapists are accomplished musicians who use their knowledge of music and its effects to help people get through medical challenges such as recovering from a stroke or healing after surgery. This all sounds great. But, as you say, it also sounds pretty New Age, and you asked if there is any evidence behind it. Actually, there is. A growing body of research attests that music therapy can improve medical outcomes and quality of life in a variety of ways.

For example, music therapy:

- Improves the experience of invasive procedures. Controlled clinical trials looked at people having colonoscopies, cardiac angiography and knee surgery. Those who listened to music before their procedure had reduced anxiety and a reduced need for sedatives. Those who listened to music in the operating room reported less discomfort during their procedure. Hearing music in the recovery room reduced the use of opioid painkillers.

- Restores lost speech. Stroke or traumatic brain injury can damage the region on the left side of the brain that is responsible for speech. Music therapy can help. How? The ability to sing originates in the right side of the brain. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.