Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Head of St. Louis Alzheimer's Assistance Group Tells Congress There Is National Crisis in Care

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Head of St. Louis Alzheimer's Assistance Group Tells Congress There Is National Crisis in Care

Article excerpt

WASHINGTON * A St. Louis director of a nonprofit that helps families care for Alzheimer's sufferers told Congress Wednesday that there was a "national crisis" because of "15 million unpaid dementia caregivers who need help today."

Lisa Baron founded Memory Care Home Solutions 16 years ago after her experiences helping to care for a mother-in-law who suffered from Alzheimer's.

Appearing before the Senate Special Committee on Aging, Baron said that her nonprofit, because of "generous" donations, helps primarily low-income families who are struggling to care for someone with the disease. More than half of her organization's clients have incomes of $20,000 or less, she said, and the services are provided at no cost.

"Our family was blessed with educational and financial resources, yet nothing prepared us for Alzheimer's disease," she told the committee, which included Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo..

Baron called it a "nightmare" and said that the family was most concerned about whether her father-in-law was getting the support and care necessary to care for his wife.

She called her program "a model that can be expanded and replicated throughout the United States," by going "directly into the homes" to help train and prepare families to treat the disease.

The hearing heard updates on federal efforts toward finding a cure for Alzheimer's by 2025. But Baron told the subcommittee that families now caring for someone should not be neglected in the meantime. Citing national statistics, she said that Alzheimer's and other dementia-related diseases cost $236 billion to treat in 2015. An estimated 5.4 million people have the disease.

McCaskill said studies predicted that the costs of treatment could reach $1 trillion annually by 2050 if there is no cure.

McCaskill said that about one of every three dollars spent on Medicaid nationally went to long-term care, "much of that for people with Alzheimer's disease," and that that ratio was probably higher in Missouri. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.