Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Trump, Clinton Win Big in NY, Push Closer to Nominations

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Trump, Clinton Win Big in NY, Push Closer to Nominations

Article excerpt

NEW YORK * Front-runners Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton swept to resounding victories in Tuesday's New York primary, with Trump bouncing back from a difficult stretch in his Republican campaign and Clinton pushing tantalizingly close to locking up the Democratic nomination.

"The race for the nomination is in the homestretch, and victory is in sight," Clinton declared to cheering supporters.

Trump's victory was a psychological boost for his campaign, though the impact on his path to the GOP nomination was to be determined by the number of delegates he secured.

He seemed headed to capture more than 50 percent of the vote, putting him in a strong position to win most of New York's 95 delegates, an impressive haul. A confident Trump declared that it was "impossible" for his rivals to catch him.

"We don't have much of a race anymore," he said during a victory rally in the lobby of the Manhattan tower bearing his name. He peppered his brash remarks with more references to the economy and other policy proposals than normal, reflecting the influence of a new team of advisers seeking to professionalize his campaign.

Clinton's triumph padded her delegate lead over rival Bernie Sanders and strengthened her claim to the Democratic nomination that eluded her eight years ago. Clinton's campaign is eager to turn toward the general election and heal wounds with Sanders' enthusiastic supporters.

With 247 delegates at stake, Clinton picked up at least 104 while Sanders gained at least 85. Many remained to be allocated, pending final vote tallies.

Exit polls suggested Democrats were ready to rally around whoever the party nominates. Nearly 7 in 10 Sanders supporters in New York said that they would definitely or probably vote for Clinton if she is the party's pick.

Sanders energized young people and liberals in New York, as he has across the country, but it wasn't enough to pull off the upset victory he needed to change the trajectory of the Democratic race. Still, the senator from Vermont vowed to keep competing.

"We've got a shot to victory," Sanders said in an interview with The Associated Press. "We have come a very long way in the last 11 months, and we are going to fight this out until the end of the process."

The fight for New York's delegate haul consumed the presidential contenders for two weeks, an eternity in the fast-moving White House race. Candidates blanketed every corner of New York, bidding for votes from Manhattan and the surrounding boroughs to the working class cities and rural enclaves that dot the rest of the state.

The nominating contests will stay centered in the Northeast in the coming days, with Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania all holding contests next week. Sanders spent Tuesday in Pennsylvania, as did Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, Trump's closest rival. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.