Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

His Safe Approach and His Subterfuge

Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

His Safe Approach and His Subterfuge

Article excerpt

Calvin Coolidge said, "The right thing to do never requires any subterfuge. It is always simple and direct."

At the bridge table, that can be right and wrong, sometimes even in the same deal. In today's layout, how should South plan the play in six hearts after West leads the diamond 10 to dummy's king? What is the best defense against this contract?

North responded with a splinter bid. He showed four-plus hearts, at least game-forcing values, and a singleton (or void) in clubs. South then bid what he hoped he could make.

Since South's third diamond could be discarded on dummy's spade queen and his club seven ruffed on the board, declarer apparently needed only to avoid losing two trump tricks. The concern was a 3-0 break.

The right play at trick two is for South to lead dummy's heart two and, when East covers with the three, to put on his four! …

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