Newspaper article International New York Times

Leadership in Australia Braces for Vote Results ; Election over Weekend Could Cause Governing Coalition to Lose Power

Newspaper article International New York Times

Leadership in Australia Braces for Vote Results ; Election over Weekend Could Cause Governing Coalition to Lose Power

Article excerpt

Awaiting final results from the weekend vote, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said he was "quietly confident," despite a predicted loss of seats.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull of Australia said on Sunday that he believed his conservative Liberal National coalition would be returned to power despite the possible loss of its significant majority in national elections held Saturday.

"I remain quietly confident that a majority coalition government will be returned at this election when the counting is completed," Mr. Turnbull said at a news conference here on Sunday afternoon.

Analysts said absentee votes submitted by mail and votes cast early at polling places could affect the outcome of the elections. About 30 percent of Australia's 15.6 million voters cast their ballots in these ways.

According to official projections on Sunday from the Australian Electoral Commission, the governing coalition, which includes the Liberal and National Parties, was leading in 67 seats and the Australian Labor Party was ahead in 71 seats.

Parties need the support from at least 76 seats in Australia's 150-seat House of Representatives to form a government

The Nick Xenophon Team was expected to win two seats, the Greens party was set to win one seat and independent candidates were set to win three seats.

The contests for six seats were still undecided on Sunday. Counting will resume on Tuesday.

Mr. Turnbull's coalition held 90 seats before the election was called.

The loss of a majority would throw into question Mr. Turnbull's leadership of the party, his decision to unseat his predecessor Tony Abbott just 10 months ago, and his gamble that calling an early election would deliver a stronger mandate to lead.

"He might limp back into government, but he is in a weakened position," Peter Chen, a political analyst from the University of Sydney said of Mr. Turnbull.

Neither Mr. Turnbull nor the opposition Labor leader, Bill Shorten, had conceded defeat Saturday after the polls had closed, with about 70 percent of the votes counted.

Speaking to Labor Party supporters gathered at the Moonee Valley Racing Club in Melbourne on Saturday night, Mr. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.