Newspaper article International New York Times

U.S. Plans Tough Rules for Truck Emissions ; Tractor-Trailers' Output of Carbon Dioxide Would Be Cut 25% over 10 Years

Newspaper article International New York Times

U.S. Plans Tough Rules for Truck Emissions ; Tractor-Trailers' Output of Carbon Dioxide Would Be Cut 25% over 10 Years

Article excerpt

The standards, more stringent than rules first proposed last year, aim to cut carbon emissions from tractor trailers by 25 percent over the next 10 years.

The Obama administration on Tuesday issued aggressive new emissions standards for heavy-duty trucks -- rules that are expected to achieve better fuel efficiency and a bigger cut in pollution than the version first proposed last year.

Officials said the new standards would require up to a 25 percent reduction in carbon emissions for big tractor-trailers over the next 10 years, and somewhat smaller improvements for delivery trucks, school buses and other large vehicles.

Over all, administration officials said the new rules would cut 1.1 billion tons of carbon emissions through 2027 and represent a global benchmark for reducing vehicle-exhaust pollutants linked to climate change.

The carbon-reduction target is 10 percent more than when the rules were proposed last year, and was made tougher after a public comment period.

"We are way out ahead of any other country," said Gina McCarthy, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said the trucking industry would save an estimated $170 billion in fuel costs through 2027.

Currently, heavy trucks average about six miles per gallon in fuel consumption. While there was no specific target released for industrywide fuel economy, the standards call for significant reductions in emissions beyond the first phase of rules that were enacted in 2014.

It will be up to engine and truck-tractor makers to determine how to meet the new standards, using various technologies to improve fuel economy and reduce carbon emissions.

The standards were reached after a year-long comment period on the proposed rules, as well as hundreds of meetings between regulators and representatives from industry and environmental groups.

"We are at a pivotal point in our fight against climate change and its catastrophic consequences," Mr. Foxx said in a conference call.

The new standards are designed to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions from tractor-trailers and other large vehicles that transport steel, cars, oil and consumer products. …

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