Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

Realism Rules at the Bridge Table

Newspaper article The Topeka Capital-Journal

Realism Rules at the Bridge Table

Article excerpt

Susan Jeffers was a psychologist and author of self-help literature who surprisingly said, "We have been taught to believe that negative equals realistic and positive equals unrealistic."

Why did that happen? At the bridge table, it pays to be realistic. Do not assume, for example, that an opponent has opened one of a suit with only nine high-card points.

What is the realistic defense that East should adopt in this deal? West leads the spade jack against four hearts.

North's four-diamond response was a splinter bid, showing at least game-going values in hearts with a singleton (or void) in diamonds. If your partnership does not use splinters, North should respond three clubs if it would be a strong jump shift (which shows either an excellent club one-suiter or a heart-club two-suiter). …

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