Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Aerospace Amrica Draws Computer Game Developers

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Aerospace Amrica Draws Computer Game Developers

Article excerpt

Journal Record Staff Reporter Aerospace America, Oklahoma City's premier air show, has developed sch a reputation in its first five years that even people in the industry recommend coming here to see the largest gathering of aircraft. At least that's what folks in Eugene, Ore., found out when they started development of a personal computer game dealing with World War II air combat. "I'm not sure just where I first heard of Aerospace America," said Sher Alltucker, theatrical coordinator and image producer for Dynamix Inc. "But I kept getting these hot tips and informa- tion about your air show till finally we contacted people there about filming some of your World War II planes. Now, everything is set." A photographer will shoot pictures of the cockpit and instrument panel of several airplanes, including an authentic Japanese Zero which will be on display. The photographer will also shoot pic- tures from the pilot's viewpoint looking out toward both wingtips, toward the tail and over the nose. All these photographs will be scanned into the computer for inclusion in the game, along with photographs of cos- tumed actors. "We have full sound to go along with the game, but not voice at this time, because of the limited memory storage capability," she said. "That's (voice interaction with the operator) coming, but for right now there will be text boxes at the bottom of the screen, sort of like a comic book. The end result will be production of a cross between a silent movie and a comic book." The game will be much like two previous personal computer games deal- ing with the U.S. Air Force A-10 Warthog and the Red Baron World War I German flying ace, Alltucker said. It simulates flying, giving the player a feeling of being in the cockpit during aerial maneuvers. The games are& designed for International Business Machines Corp. computers, but the two previous games were also adapted to another type of computer. "We're not sure just exactly how many types of computers will be able to use these games, but we are expanding them," she said. "We hope this latest game is on the market by October or November." She would not reveal the name of the game. At first, Alltucker said, she contacted the Confederate AirForce in Harlingen, Texas, to film interiors of some Ameri- can airplanes and the Japanese Zero. Because of the nature of the planned game, not just any Zero would work. This has to be an authentic World War II Mitsubishi-built airplane that saw ser- vice against the Allied forces in World War II. Those are hard to find. Less than a dozen are still in flying condition in the world. But the Confederate Air Force has one. It was shot down near an unidenti- fied South Pacific Island during a fight with U.S. forces about mid-way through World War II, according to Dick Millan, Warbirds coordinator for Aerospace America. …
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