Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Studying Restorative Facial Art Helps Students Learn Techniques

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Studying Restorative Facial Art Helps Students Learn Techniques

Article excerpt

Journal Record Staff Reporter

In a classroom at the University of Central Oklahoma, students use plastic skulls, metal spatulas and wads of oily wax to form eyelids, noses and lips.

The students are not taking an art course. They are learning a craft that is closer in its mission to photography than sculpture. They are attempting to duplicate, not create.

The course is restorative facial art, and most of the students are studying to work in funeral homes. The course teaches future morticians how to remove damaged facial tissue from corpses, replace it with wax and cover the wax with cosmetics.

Funeral professionals sometimes use the technique when the family of a deceased individual requests that a fever blister or cancer sore be removed. The course also teaches students to replace eyebrows and lashes, a technique occasionally performed on cancer victims.

In very rare instances, a funeral worker may need to reconstruct an entire face, as in the case of a burn victim. …

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