Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

KFC's Twister Blows through KC Lunchtime Market

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

KFC's Twister Blows through KC Lunchtime Market

Article excerpt

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- It's a fact of American life. While we're driving, we like to do a lot of other things -- including munching fast food.

Seizing on that idea, KFC is testing a new product in the Kansas City area called a Chicken Twister, designed to be eaten on the run.

It's not a new notion. "Wraps," as they're known in the fast- food industry, started popping up at independent restaurants last year on the West Coast. That's no surprise, given that folks in Los Angeles are legendary for the hours they spend driving each day. But Midwesterners love their autos, too, making this part of the country equally attractive for testing the concept. Kansas City is one of only two metropolitan areas in the nation where the Twister is being tested. Tom Peters, a KFC marketing manager, said the chicken chain's driving motivation behind the Twister is to get more lunch-time business. "It's a fact -- lunch is a time-sensitive part of the day," Peters said. "People don't have time to wait in line, sit down, eat and lallygag around." Presently, about 20 percent to 25 percent of KFC's sales come at lunchtime. The chain would like to pump up its midday business starting with the Chicken Twister. "We're known for our dinners," Peters said. "Now, we want more lunchtime eaters." Rather than go with something like a hamburger -- or a "meat block" sandwich, as it's called in the industry -- KFC pursued something more offbeat. It's about as far removed from the Colonel Sanders era as the Macarena is from the twist. The sandwich is built from chilled chunks of skinless chicken breast, bacon bits, iceberg lettuce, tomato morsels, shredded cheddar cheese and ranch dressing, all tightly rolled in a piece of pita bread. The sandwich is then wrapped in special wax-paper packaging that allows people to twist off the wrapper as they eat the sandwich.Thus the name -- Twister. Area police departments aren't crazy about the idea. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in Washington, 6.1 percent of all auto accidents in 1994 involving a fatality were attributed to inattention, including eating while driving. "I think we would discourage anyone from doing anything that takes their attention away from driving," said Sgt. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.