Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Capitalizing on I-35

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Capitalizing on I-35

Article excerpt

If ever there was a time for private investors to step forward in a bid for a government project in central Oklahoma, it's now.

When Interstate Highway 35 is officially designated an international trade corridor -- which means that extra federal money will be allocated for rehabilitation and maintenance -- the area south of the intersection of I-40 and I-35 will become prime real estate.

That's because a provision in the bill being proposed to Congress calls for an inland port of entry, or a customs center with some other name, to be located at a far enough distance from the Mexican border to reduce time of shipment to and from Mexico. "This is something the government can't do; it must be done by the private sector," said state Sen. Keith Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City. The reason the private sector must step forward is because of the amount of land needed -- a minimum of roughly a quarter section, or 160 acres -- plus services for trucks and truckers. These services include everything from truck parts and accessories to motel rooms and restaurants. They also would include offices for experts on import and export law, light manufacturing inside a free trade zone. No estimate has been made of what it would cost to build such a center, but without all those services, truck drivers would bypass Oklahoma and move to another inland port. This port would be a center for local economic development, according to Tiffany Newsom, recently named administrator for North America's Superhighway Coalition, which is lobbying the length of I- 35 and its Canadian and Mexican connection roads for the designation. "We must be prepared for intermodalism so that cargo can be changed from one mode to another at the port," Newsom said. "We also must have some sort of light manufacturing and assembly available because manufacturers in Europe may send their goods to the United States for final assembly before shipping them into Mexico or Canada. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.