Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

A Definite Competitive Edge

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

A Definite Competitive Edge

Article excerpt

Lurking out there is a virtual subculture -- an entire underworld rebelling against week nights filled with sitcoms and take-out.

While the rest of us blissfully sink ourselves into easy chairs at the end of the workday -- fingering the remote in a bleary-eyed daze -- these deviants head off to classrooms and libraries, books in hand.

In a market glutted with BBAs and CPAs, almost 1,000 professionals in the Oklahoma City area each year bank on advanced degrees to set them apart from the pinstripe milieu. "The more education you have, the better chance you have of increasing your value to your company -- and your salary," says Oklahoma City University MBA candidate Karen Wallace. An accountant for the Federal Aviation Administration, Wallace takes nine hours of MBA courses each semester in addition to working a full load for the FAA. She notes that the flex-time policy at the FAA enables her to meet course work demands. "I don't see how people with families do it," Wallace remarks. "Not getting fatigued is my biggest challenge." Also fighting a time crunch is Dr. Raymund King: ear, nose and throat physician by day, law student by night. King, a nationally-renowned antibody researcher, says he developed an interest in law when an intellectual property issue arose in conjunction with research he was conducting at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. His newly-discovered fascination with the law, however, has led to a very hectic schedule After seeing patients all day, King heads off to the OCU night school program where he plans to complete his law degree by spring of 2000. He maintains that keeping on top of all the day's demands requires scheduling finesse. "I know what I'm doing every minute of the day," he says. "I study late at night and early, early in the morning." King plans on a career in medical malpractice -- defense side, of course -- after graduation. Pursuing an advanced degree takes more than a yearning for big bucks. The reality is sacrificed weekends, wee-hour study sessions, and strained personal relationships. "My home life suffered," concedes Kerianne Roper, practice administrator for Partners in Women's Health. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.