Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Dealing with Allergies to Stay Productive at Work

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Dealing with Allergies to Stay Productive at Work

Article excerpt

Allergic rhinitis is more than a runny nose. One in every five Americans suffers from this chronic, sometimes debilitating condition that can lead to sinus and middle-ear infections, headaches, fatigue and irritability.

These allergy symptoms result in more than 11 million office visits per year, and costs of treatment are estimated at $10 billion a year. Allergies also account for many lost days of work.

For those who are allergic to molds or pollens, allergic rhinitis tends to be seasonal, and spring is a prime time for tree pollens to infiltrate the air. When the runny, stuffy, itchy, sneezy nose and watery, itching eyes strike, allergy victims often turn to over-the- counter medications for quick relief. Antihistamines are used to treat the runny nose and watery eyes. However, these nonprescription products have sedating properties that, when taken while working, can result in increased risk of injury, low productivity and poor workmanship on the job. A little education during prime allergy seasons can help avoid such problems. Employers can use employee newsletters, flyers or other communication tools to convey information about effective allergy treatment. Make supervisors aware of the potential drowsiness problem. Many employers require that any employee taking medication (prescription or nonprescription) report it to the medical department before going to work. Avoidance: The best way to treat allergic rhinitis is to avoid contact with the allergen, but it is difficult to do that when pollen is the culprit. Keep windows closed and use an air purifier or an air conditioner to filter out some of the pollens; a physician or an allergy specialist can help determine what allergy is triggering the symptoms. Antihistamines: Anyone planning to take an antihistamine to relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny nose and itching of the eyes and nose should talk to a doctor. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.