Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Dow Jones Teaches Principles of Islamic Investing Online

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Dow Jones Teaches Principles of Islamic Investing Online

Article excerpt

PRINCETON, N.J. (AP) -- The Prophet of Islam was no stranger to the marketplace. Mohammed's example as a successful trader has been emulated by Muslims for generations.

Since the seventh century, religious scholars have been interpreting Islamic law and establishing acceptable business practices and investment guidelines for Muslims.

Now, they are taking those tenets to the Internet. Dow Jones University (www.dju.com), a division of Dow Jones & Co., which publishes The Wall Street Journal, has gathered four highly regarded experts in the field of Islamic law to teach an online course titled "Principles of Islamic Investing."

"While conventional thinking on Wall Street is that religion has no place in investment decisions, the Islamic faith asserts emphatically that it has everything to do with those decisions," said Yusuf Talal DeLorenzo, of Ashburn, Va., an Islamic scholar and course instructor.

Islamic investing is fast emerging as a financial sector.

There are between 4 million and 6 million Muslims living in the United States, and Muslims are the nation's fast-growing population segment, according to the Macdonald Center for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations at Hartford Seminary in Connecticut.

Muslims worldwide have $80 billion-$150 billion to invest, a figure that is growing between 12 percent and 15 percent per year, said A. …

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