Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Filmmaker Lynne Ramsay Didn't Give Up on 'We Need to Talk about Kevin': Lynne Ramsay Determined to Make 'Kevin'

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Filmmaker Lynne Ramsay Didn't Give Up on 'We Need to Talk about Kevin': Lynne Ramsay Determined to Make 'Kevin'

Article excerpt

TORONTO - When Scottish filmmaker Lynne Ramsay first approached BBC Films about turning the provocative novel "We Need to Talk About Kevin" into a movie, she was told it was too dark.

David Thompson, head of the company at the time, said the lead character -- a dispirited mother who clashes with her malevolent child -- was "quite off-putting in a way," recalls Ramsay.

But she didn't give up.

Ramsay was compelled to explore what she felt was "fascinating subject matter that doesn't often get spoken about," so she reworked Lionel Shriver's story for the big screen and BBC Films finally gave it the green light.

"I've seen other women who've felt the same, you know, their mates feel this amazing feeling of being a mom right away and they don't feel that instant connection and I thought that was kind of dangerous, interesting territory," said Ramsay, the film's director and co-writer, in an interview at the 2011 Toronto International Film Festival.

"Movies are about provocation as well and they're also to ask questions. I'm not trying to make social commentary, but I do want to make a really interesting, challenging piece of cinema."

"We Need to Talk About Kevin" -- which debuted last May at the Cannes Film Festival -- opens Friday in Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton and Ottawa. It's due to hit more Canadian cities next week.

Oscar winner Tilda Swinton ("Michael Clayton") stars as Eva, an avid traveller who becomes depressed when she and her husband (John C. Reilly) have their first child, a manipulative boy who's defiant and violent around his mother.

Through flash forwards, we learn that Kevin has done something horrific in his community and it's made Eva into a guilt-plagued social outcast.

The story raises the nature versus nurture debate as it explores whether Eva's inability to feel a bond with her unborn child made him into a terror, or if his behaviour is in his DNA.

Ezra Miller, who plays Kevin as a teen, said he didn't see his character as either good or evil.

"There was a way to perform this in an honest way because Kevin is performing," the New Jersey-raised actor said in an interview with Ramsay during TIFF, where the film screened. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.