Newspaper article The Canadian Press

How Toronto's Chris Cheung Got to Take the Stage at Apple's iPad Unveiling: What It's like to Speak at an iPad Unveiling

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

How Toronto's Chris Cheung Got to Take the Stage at Apple's iPad Unveiling: What It's like to Speak at an iPad Unveiling

Article excerpt

TORONTO - A bewildered roar exploded in the Toronto office of software maker Autodesk this week when Chris Cheung walked onstage at Apple's much-hyped unveiling of the new iPad.

It's no secret that Apple's product launches operate on a strict need-to-know basis, which was why Cheung, a senior product manager with Autodesk, couldn't tell most of his Canadian colleagues that the upcoming SketchBook Ink app would be featured as part of the iPad event.

And although Cheung was invited to perform a live demo of his company's software on the latest iPad, even he wasn't privy to any early details about the new tablet. Not a week, not a day, not an hour, not even a few minutes before the announcement. He was told nothing.

"I was backstage ... and I'm half trying to remember what I'm going to talk about, but half watching what they were announcing," says Cheung.

"I was pretty much in the same boat as you guys, in the sense of learning what they were announcing."

It was a whirlwind week between getting the call from Apple, offering Cheung two minutes to talk about the new app, and the actual presentation itself.

The fact that Cheung and a partner would be conducting their presentation off the newest iPad, which they previously had not touched or seen, actually wasn't the biggest hurdle.

"In this industry I think there's a lot of trying to stay ahead of the curve and trying to make your best guesses," says Cheung, adding that developers were prepared for the new iPad to have Apple's high resolution retina display.

"The good news is we supported retina display on the iPhone before, so it wasn't a big surprise. A lot of our code we already had prepared to be able to run on a future device that could potentially have retina display, so a lot of pieces came together."

The biggest challenge was in fighting nerves and perfecting the delivery of his two-minute script. But he had help with that.

"From my perspective, as a speaker ... getting to see a little bit of how Apple throws an event was definitely quite exciting," Cheung says.

"I obviously had a chance to come down and rehearse, they definitely run a really good program -- so I wasn't just pulled off the front seat and asked to speak. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.