Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Right to Play Benefits from Technology Gift, Looks to Reach More Kids in Need: Right to Play Benefits from Technology Gift

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Right to Play Benefits from Technology Gift, Looks to Reach More Kids in Need: Right to Play Benefits from Technology Gift

Article excerpt

TORONTO - Combine good technology with good intentions and the possibilities are endless.

At least that's the hope of Right To Play as it plans to make the best use of the philanthropy of Polycom Inc.

Toronto-based Right To Play is an international humanitarian organization that looks to use sport and play to give hope and teach essential skills to children in regions ravaged by war, poverty and disease.

Polycom is a California-based company, with offices in Canada, that used video conferencing and other technology to bring businesses and people together.

Polycom is donating that expertise to Right To Play, allowing it to vastly increase its outreach to countries far afield.

"We're obviously extremely thrilled about this partnership," said Laura Ryder, Right To Play's global director of communications and corporate sponsorships.

"It's going to open up so many opportunities for our communication and for us to get our message out, reinforce our training, provide really innovative opportunities for our donors. And I think just really be innovative as well, which is something we pride ourselves on. . . . Polycom is similarly innovative and we think it's just been a real perfect fit."

So how will it work?

Currently, Right To Play is involved in more than 20 countries. That means sending staff overseas to train locals on how to implement the group's programs on the ground.

Based in Toronto, that training team numbers just three to four.

Thanks to Polycom's video conferencing system, a lot of that can now be done without packing a bag.

"This obviously saves us time. It saves us a lot of travel. It saves us all those things," Ryder said in an interview. "But it also allows us to have more contact. Because if you can imagine again going from Thailand to Africa to the Middle East, it's an extensive amount of travel and time involved.

"The Polycom systems will allow us to speak more frequently with our people on the ground and sort of refresh that training, maybe have discussions about any other number of issues that we might want to deal with at a local level, face to face without having to travel or have exchanges over email.

"That's a huge asset for us and something that hasn't been available before. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.