Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Editorial Exchange: Fake Tans, Real Risks: Editorial Exchange: Fake Tans, Real Risks

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Editorial Exchange: Fake Tans, Real Risks: Editorial Exchange: Fake Tans, Real Risks

Article excerpt

An editorial from the Red Deer Advocate, published April 30:

Jokingly, it's been called "fake 'n' bake," the term describing a so-called healthy-looking tan that young people sport by spending time at the tanning salon.

But that sexy golden glow is hardly a laughing matter, and anything but healthy. In fact, according to experts, it's just as unhealthy as lighting up a cigarette or inhaling asbestos dust.

Research has linked the UVA and UBV rays emitted by artificial tanning lights to the potentially deadly skin cancer melanoma. And it's on the rise in Canada and elsewhere, especially among young women who could pay a dangerous price for vanity, according to the World Health Organization.

The World Health Organization rates the harmful rays cooking one's skin as a Class 1 cancer-causing agent, sharing the same carcinogenic rating given to tobacco and asbestos.

And the end results are anything but sexy when one's young body is carved up to remove cancerous growths, as was experienced by Kate Neale of Belleville, Ont.

Neale was among 90 volunteers for the Canadian Cancer Society at the Ontario legislature last week to support a private member's bill calling for a ban on indoor tanning for anyone under 18.

This will be the third time NDP health critic France Gelinas has proposed the Skin Cancer Prevention Act, demanding strict marketing and promotion practices aimed at young tanning salon clients.

"Tanning salons directly target youth through advertising in yearbooks and in schools before prom and graduation," said Gelinas. "Not only do salons either not know or play down the lifelong consequences of excess exposure to UV rays, they make tanning accessible and attractive for young people."

Neale was transfixed by the bronzed beauties of Hollywood and began her "fake 'n' baking" at 16. Unending compliments by friends about her new, attractive look made her a regular at the salons. Five years later, an innocent-looking freckle below her belly button was diagnosed as malignant melanoma. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.