Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Canadian Show 'Eat St' Stops in Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver on Street Truck Tour: 'Eat St.' Stops in Toronto, Calgary on Foodie Tour

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Canadian Show 'Eat St' Stops in Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver on Street Truck Tour: 'Eat St.' Stops in Toronto, Calgary on Foodie Tour

Article excerpt

TORONTO - The shot-around-the-world but produced-in-Canada show "Eat St." kicks off its third season Wednesday with some homegrown flavours, including a taste of the delights served from a Jewish deli truck in Toronto.

Host James Cunningham says he's thrilled the show will for the first time feature mobile eateries in Calgary and his hometown of Toronto, while also returning to Vancouver.

"It's a joy to kind of finally be able to say, 'Hey, I'm just down the street from my place here in Toronto, finally, and we have a great, great truck," says Cunningham, who laments that Canada is still quite behind the U.S. when it comes to accepting truck-based restaurants on its streets.

"It's starting up in Toronto, for sure, Alberta's got a fairly infant scene, but I think Vancouver -- largely because of the weather, and that West Coast mentality -- they seem to have a pretty good street food presence."

But it's mostly bureaucratic red tape that keeps Canadians from fully jumping on the food truck bandwagon, not a lack of appetite for mobile food offerings, he says. He insists Canadians would be eager to join the food truck movement just as enthusiastically as down south -- if governments would pave the way.

"You go to a street food truck and what you have going on is an experience, it's not just really about the food, it's not just the ambience, it's everything," he says.

"It's delicious street food stuff you haven't seen anywhere else, stuff that you really often times can't find in a restaurant, like deep fried cupcakes, poutine fusion."

In the third season's first episode, Toronto-based Caplansky's deli serves up its WZE sandwich -- kosher-style salami, schmaltz-laced chopped liver, red onions and Russian honey mustard on a mini challah bun -- while a truck out of Austin, Texas showcases its doughnuts, which are injected with jalapeno jelly and topped with cream cheese and Canadian bacon.

Some Canadians are already familiar with the offerings of Toronto's Smoke's Poutinerie -- which now has more than two dozen locations across the country and is eyeing expansion into the U.S. -- but Cunningham says the show's American viewers will be agog at the outlet's creations, featured later in the season. …

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