Newspaper article The Canadian Press

High Humidity and Sizzling Temperatures Making Summer Sultry in Western Canada

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

High Humidity and Sizzling Temperatures Making Summer Sultry in Western Canada

Article excerpt

Humidity making summer sultry in the West

--

REGINA - The land of the wind chill has become the home of humidity.

Humidex advisories issued Tuesday warned that it could feel like 40 C or higher in many parts of central and southern Saskatchewan. Parts of east-central Alberta were also sweating it out during sultry summer days not much seen in recent years.

Dave Phillips, senior climatologist at Environment Canada, said humidex advisories aren't that common in a region better known for its skin-cracking dryness.

"Western Saskatchewan and also in Alberta, it's unheard of. It's very foreign," said Phillips. "It's not something that they even worry about.

"You pride yourself in (saying), 'Our cold is dry; our heat is dry.' Sometimes I think you think your precipitation is dry and that's not the case."

Phillips noted that Edmonton had an "unbelievable" humidex value of 39 on Monday.

Even Yellowknife was a sultry 30 degrees with a humidex value of 32. Phillips said the Northwest Territories capital usually has one day above 30 C every two years. It's been two so far this week, according to Environment Canada's website.

Humidex combines temperature and humidity -- the amount of water vapour in the air -- to reflect the perceived temperature. For example, the temperature in Regina at one p.m. Tuesday was 31 C, but with the humidity it felt like 40.

Humidex advisories are part of the lazy, hazy days of summer in Central Canada. It is an "odd thing" for the West.

"It's sort of something that is so Torontonian and that probably irritates westerners more than anything, to think that they're associated with Toronto. I guess about the only thing they don't have is the haze," said Phillips.

There are two sources for the humidity. One is a big high pressure system sending hot air up from the Gulf of Mexico.

"But I think the vast majority of the humidity is coming from homegrown sources, from local sources, all that precipitation you were cursing there in May and June," Phillips said. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.