Newspaper article China Post

Forgiveness, Repentance and Progress for the New Year

Newspaper article China Post

Forgiveness, Repentance and Progress for the New Year

Article excerpt

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For most of the people in Taiwan, the new Year of the Serpent began on the first day of the first moon on the Chinese lunar calendar, which fell on Feb. 10 on the Gregorian calendar this year. Traditionally, Chinese people celebrate their New Year Festival for five days, but the festive spirit is very much in the air until the Lantern Festival, which is marked on the fifteenth day of the first moon, falling on Feb. 24. It's still time for us to make belated New Year's wishes.

Before making New Year's wishes, we should thank God or Heaven for our luck not to have any elections in the Year of the Serpent. In a democracy, elections are inevitable, like paying taxes, but we don't like the divisive elections we used to have that hurt our communal harmony. We are happy we don't have to pray for sparing us such elections this time around.

To help Taiwan repair the half-broken communal harmony, we wish President Ma Ying-jeou would give our impenitent former President Chen Shui-bian a pardon, if possible, or a respite from behind the bars. Mr. Chen, who is doing time for corruption and graft, serves himself right, of course. But he is ill, though maybe not so ill as he presents himself to be. He had better be given a chance to have a family reunion like everybody else, come the next Year of the Horse. Ma doesn't want to pardon Chen until the court of law settles all the cases involving the ex-head of state. But it takes too much time. We wish Mr. Ma, whose family name means the horse, would let Mr. Chen reunite with his family in the Year of the Horse. On one condition, however. Mr. Chen has to repent.

So, let us wish Mr. Chen would emulate the Wudi Emperor of the Han Dynasty who ruled China from 140 to 86 B.C. The emperor taxed the people so heavily to finance the military expansion of his empire that the dynasty began to decline. So Wudi issued the first imperial rescript for penitence ([...]) in Chinese history. But the emperor did not actually blame himself. He blamed his army. Nor did he confess the mistakes he made during his long rule to expand the empire. …

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