Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Mandatory Minimums May Harm Some, Ottawa Says in Landmark Appeal Arguments

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Mandatory Minimums May Harm Some, Ottawa Says in Landmark Appeal Arguments

Article excerpt

Mandatory minimums may harm some: Ottawa

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TORONTO - A small group of people might be harmed by mandatory minimum sentences for gun crimes, but Parliament is entitled to deference in how it tries to enhance public safety, the federal government argues.

The point is one of many Ottawa is making in support of the thorny issue of mandatory minimums, as Ontario's highest court gets set to hear a number of landmark cases.

A special five-judge panel of the Court of Appeal for Ontario will consider the constitutionality of minimum sentences for several gun-crime laws in six cases that are set to be heard together from Tuesday to Friday.

The mandatory minimums were struck down in one case and upheld in the rest -- though narrowly in one -- and hearing all of them at the same time gives the court the opportunity to send a uniform message in a currently fragmented landscape.

Ontario's attorney general has carriage of the prosecution of these cases, but the federal government is adding its voice to the fight as an intervener.

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the African Canadian Legal Clinic and the John Howard Society are also intervening.

The Department of Justice arguments, as laid out in court documents, focus on the three-year mandatory minimum sentence for unlicensed possession of a loaded restricted or prohibited gun -- weapons such as handguns, machine-guns and sawed-off shotguns.

The penalty, enacted in 2008 as part of a Conservative omnibus crime bill, raised the minimum sentence from one year.

An Ontario Superior Court judge struck down the law last year as unconstitutional, ruling that it constituted cruel and unusual punishment for Leroy Smickle, who was caught alone in his boxers in his cousin's apartment posing with a loaded handgun while taking pictures of himself to post on Facebook.

Critics in the legal community say mandatory minimums don't reduce crime and do more harm than good.

The federal government concedes in court documents that one of the potentially harmful effects of the law is that a "small number of offenders" will have to spend longer in prison than they would without the three-year minimum.

"Parliament, however, is entitled to take a sterner view of the seriousness of this offence, based on its appreciation of evolving social conditions and values," it wrote in court documents.

"It is also entitled to limit judicial discretion in pursuit of that goal. Parliament has sought to enhance public safety by deterring criminal misuse of firearms, and it is entitled to deference in pursuit of that objective."

In its court documents Ottawa details the rules and regulations surrounding gun ownership, particularly the very strictly regulated handguns.

"Licensing and registration of restricted and prohibited firearms serve an important public safety function because police have ready access to records kept in the Canadian Firearms Registry," the government lawyers wrote.

"This allows police to know whether or what kind of registered firearm might be present at a given place."

That argument is one that was used by police chiefs in support of keeping the long-gun registry, which the Tories scrapped last year. The registry still captures other firearms.

The mandatory minimums were enacted in response to the scourge of illegal handguns, the federal government says in its court documents. The three-year penalty is not cruel and unusual, Ottawa argues, because anyone convicted had to knowingly possess a loaded, prohibited or restricted gun either without authorization or without a license. …

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