Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Space Aliens, Explored in Documentary

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Space Aliens, Explored in Documentary

Article excerpt

Aliens, explored from A-Z in documentary

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MONTREAL - Maybe those science-fiction scenarios about killer robots from space invading the Earth aren't so far-fetched after all.

Aliens bearing little resemblance to Steven Spielberg's cuddly "ET" might actually eye Earth for its potential slaves and to plunder its natural resources, say scientists interviewed in "Aliens: The Definitive Guide," a new documentary being broadcast Sunday on Discovery Canada.

In short, they might be a lot like humans were when they explored new lands.

But don't go running for the shelters just yet.

Even if aliens are headed for us now, space travel can take thousands of years using currently known technology, which probably rules out the possibility of any malevolent ETs touching down during our lifetime, anyway.

Producer Alan Handel says aliens are a "never-ending preoccupation" for people, so making the documentary was a no-brainer. He says surveys indicate that many Canadians believe extra-terrestrials exist and may already have dropped in.

"I just think it's a really neat concept to say 'OK, let's take it seriously and let's go to some of the best scientific minds in the world and see what they have to say.'"

However, "Aliens: The Definitive Guide" isn't a tale of extra-terrestrial terror and instead entertainingly poses an exhaustive list of questions about who may be beyond the stars.

What planets might have life? How might its inhabitants get here? What would they look like? And what are their possible intentions?

These are some of the queries pondered in the two-hour film by Montreal's Handel Productions and U.K.-based Arrow Media.

A theoretical physicist at City University of New York scoffs at anyone who tries to suggest we're the only life forms in the universe.

"Gimme a break," Michio Kaku says in the documentary.

"I mean, how many stars are out there in the universe anyway? …

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