Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Foreign Affairs Minister Baird Says Snowden Should Surrender to U.S

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Foreign Affairs Minister Baird Says Snowden Should Surrender to U.S

Article excerpt

Baird says Snowden should surrender to U.S.

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OTTAWA - National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden should abandon his bid for asylum in Brazil and surrender himself to the United States, Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird said Wednesday.

Baird told The Canadian Press that Snowden's actions have compromised global security.

"I think I probably agree with the Obama administration on this one," Baird said. "I think he's done significant damage to national security, of the free world."

The U.S. wants to prosecute Snowden, who was granted temporary asylum in Russia. The move angered the Obama administration and has chilled relations between Moscow and Washington.

"The United States has a free and fair justice system," Baird said, when asked about Snowden's outreach to the Brazilian government this week.

"I think he should go back to the United States and face the consequences of his actions."

Snowden's cache of documents also suggests that Communications Security Establishment Canada once monitored Brazil's mines and energy department and helped the U.S. and Britain spy on participants at the London G20 summit in 2009.

In an open letter earlier this week, Snowden praised the Brazilian government for standing up to the U.S. for spying on the country. He also said he could help Brazil dig deeper into the NSA activities, but that he would need to come to the country and be granted political asylum.

Snowden's temporary asylum in Russia is to expire in August.

Snowden's documents showed that Brazil was a prime target of the NSA in Latin America.

Reporting by the Guardian and Washington Post based on his leaked documents, detailed U.S. spying in Brazil, including the monitoring of President Dilma Rousseff's cellphone, which led her to cancel a planned visit to Washington two months ago.

The Brazilian government appears to have no immediate plan to accommodate Snowden. …

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