Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Risk of Car Crashes Jumps during Second Trimester of Pregnancy: Study

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Risk of Car Crashes Jumps during Second Trimester of Pregnancy: Study

Article excerpt

Risk of car crashes rise in during pregnancy

--

TORONTO - Pregnant women who drive appear to be at a significantly higher risk of being in a serious car crash during the second trimester of their pregnancies, a new study suggests.

The researchers, who believe fatigue and sleep disruption are probably responsible, say the increase in risk is similar to what is seen for people who suffer from sleep apnea.

"These findings suggest that pregnancy might contribute to the risk of a serious motor vehicle crash," they say in the study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Due to the design of the study, the authors cannot say there is a cause-and-effect relationship at play, only that pregnancy appears to be associated with an increase car crash risk. Nor can they say that the pregnant women were more likely to cause crashes; it could be they were simply less able to respond fast enough to avoid being in a collision while they were pregnant.

The findings relate only to motor vehicle accidents that were serious enough to require emergency department care for the pregnant driver.

First author Dr. Donald Redelmeier of the University of Toronto and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences said earlier studies have shown that for every life-threatening car crash there are about 13 others that don't end up in a visit to the emergency department.

"We estimate that about one in 50 women will be involved in a crash of some severity during some month of the average pregnancy, i.e. a one in 50 absolute risk, making it more common than pre-eclampsia or blood clots during pregnancy," said Redelmeier, who practises internal medicine at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto.

Redelmeier is an epidemiological whiz, known for teasing out of data observations like the fact that Oscar-winning actors live longer and talking on a cellphone while driving is as dangerous as driving while intoxicated. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.