Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Kenney Defends Job Bank despite Litany of Outdated Postings on Site

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Kenney Defends Job Bank despite Litany of Outdated Postings on Site

Article excerpt

Not a 'mess,' Kenney says of job bank

--

OTTAWA - The federal government will soon make enhancements to its online job bank amid revelations that hundreds of positions posted on the site have long since been filled, Employment Minister Jason Kenney said Monday.

"We are making improvements to the Canada Job Bank ... we will be using new technological developments in the near future to ensure an even better matching of unemployed Canadians with available jobs," Kenney said in the House of Commons.

The government will work with "private-sector web platforms" when provinces fail to send their own postings to the job bank, he added. Currently, most provinces and territories do so automatically.

The job bank is a critical component of Ottawa's controversial temporary foreign worker program. Employers are required to post ads on the site seeking Canadian workers for four weeks before they're able to apply to hire temporary foreign workers.

The government also relies in part on job bank data to determine what regions of the country are clamouring for labour.

But from customer service representatives in New Brunswick to food service supervisors in B.C. and RCMP clerks in Saskatchewan, many of the 110,000 jobs listed on the job bank are no longer available. A litany of postings are several months old; some have been on the site for more than a year.

Some job-seekers also complain that they never heard back from employers after applying for jobs posted online. An email address set up under a generic name by The Canadian Press has not received any replies to multiple queries about various job postings, including at companies that already employ temporary foreign workers.

Bill Wadsworth, a helicopter pilot in B.C., says he applied for jobs at numerous companies that he later learned were given a positive labour market opinion -- or LMO -- that allowed them to hire temporary foreign workers.

"I had applied to, and had the qualifications, to work for 75 per cent of the LMOs," he said in a recent interview. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.